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RAE report on the Liberator II

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11 years 4 months ago - 11 years 4 months ago #77 by PeterClare
PeterClare created the topic: RAE report on the Liberator II
In early 1942 three Coastal Command squadrons (No,s 209, 240 and 413)equipped with Catalina's, were transferred to the Indian Ocean area of operations leaving UK Coastal Command squadrons short of suitable aircraft. It was decided that Coastal would receive eight of the first delivery of twenty-two Liberator II's being prepared for the Middle East until the Catalina strength could be increased. These eight went on charge with No.120 Squadron which in time were assessed by the RAE.



Notes Concerning Liberator Mk.II Aircraft.

Taken from REPORT ON ATTACHMENT TO NO.120 SQUADRON, by Flt.Lt.A.F.Martindale, Royal
Aircraft Establishment; 25 May to 8 June 1942.

"Liberator II's operationally carry 2,066 gallons in theory, but 1,800 gallons
in practice, the reduction being caused by the 12 self-sealing cells put in the same two tanks and grouped in threes for feeding the engines. A fuel transfer system is provided.

It carries the usual depth-charges, both bomb bays being available and 14 Browning 0.303 machine guns. Four are in the rear Fraser Nash turret, one free gun is in the tail shooting downwards, two pairs of guns fire beam shots, there is a Boulton & Paul upper turret with 4 guns and a free gun in the nose. The crews have great faith in their ability to defend themselves. No ASV is fitted.

The layout of the Liberator II the navigator sits in the elongated nose and
has chart board, astrodome and Sperry bomb sight. The pilots have all the engine controls. The wireless operator is in the front compartment, the engineer has no definite function or place.

Ammunition the tension in the long belts of 2,000 rounds causes the links to
open, due to the 70-lb. feeder pull. If this is a serious cause of stoppages, it could be remedied by an auxiliary spiral spring-loaded sprocket at a suitable point in the belt.

The gun turrets have no covers, the guns go rusty and water gets on to the electric contacts.

Landing with the Mk.I there is a tendency to fly it straight on to the ground
at 110-mph, which is the approach speed, whereas...(with the Mk.II)...they touch down at a lower speed after a partial hold-off. The difference in technique is probably due to the difference in weight distribution of" the I's and II's."

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11 years 4 months ago - 11 years 4 months ago #593 by PeterClare
PeterClare replied the topic: RAE report on the Liberator II
In early 1942 three Coastal Command squadrons (No,s 209, 240 and 413)equipped with Catalina's, were transferred to the Indian Ocean area of operations leaving UK Coastal Command squadrons short of suitable aircraft. It was decided that Coastal would receive eight of the first delivery of twenty-two Liberator II's being prepared for the Middle East until the Catalina strength could be increased. These eight went on charge with No.120 Squadron which in time were assessed by the RAE.



Notes Concerning Liberator Mk.II Aircraft.

Taken from REPORT ON ATTACHMENT TO NO.120 SQUADRON, by Flt.Lt.A.F.Martindale, Royal
Aircraft Establishment; 25 May to 8 June 1942.

"Liberator II's operationally carry 2,066 gallons in theory, but 1,800 gallons
in practice, the reduction being caused by the 12 self-sealing cells put in the same two tanks and grouped in threes for feeding the engines. A fuel transfer system is provided.

It carries the usual depth-charges, both bomb bays being available and 14 Browning 0.303 machine guns. Four are in the rear Fraser Nash turret, one free gun is in the tail shooting downwards, two pairs of guns fire beam shots, there is a Boulton & Paul upper turret with 4 guns and a free gun in the nose. The crews have great faith in their ability to defend themselves. No ASV is fitted.

The layout of the Liberator II the navigator sits in the elongated nose and
has chart board, astrodome and Sperry bomb sight. The pilots have all the engine controls. The wireless operator is in the front compartment, the engineer has no definite function or place.

Ammunition the tension in the long belts of 2,000 rounds causes the links to
open, due to the 70-lb. feeder pull. If this is a serious cause of stoppages, it could be remedied by an auxiliary spiral spring-loaded sprocket at a suitable point in the belt.

The gun turrets have no covers, the guns go rusty and water gets on to the electric contacts.

Landing with the Mk.I there is a tendency to fly it straight on to the ground
at 110-mph, which is the approach speed, whereas...(with the Mk.II)...they touch down at a lower speed after a partial hold-off. The difference in technique is probably due to the difference in weight distribution of" the I's and II's."

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